Children and Elders Combine Powers at PHF!

On Sunday, 18th of February 2018, Thinq2Win conducted a special and unique quiz at the Pune Heritage Festival. Spanning topics of culture and heritage, the teams explored questions on India, Maharashtra, and most of all Pune. Questions were brilliantly answered by children and their guardians as appearances were made by Nana Phadnavis, Sawai Gandharva, IUCAA, Marz-o-rin and Gagan Narang.

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The quiz started with a written opening round of 20 questions. This was followed by a mélange of passing rounds, a connect and a written round. The connect round was unique as the children and their guardian were separated for this round. Answering every element of the connect earned more points if the child answered it too. However, the twist was that the 'Connect' could only be attempted by the child. The correct answer was shown after the question for each element, to make it easier.

The competition was close as answers were gobbled up right, left and centre by the teams. Even the toughies that passed around were answered by the audience. It went down to the last question where despite two teams getting bonus points, one triumphed over the other thanks to a five point lead from a previous round.

The quiz was hosted by our experienced team-member, Omkar Yarguddi and he was assisted by Omkar Dhakephalkar.

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A couple of questions from the set. Answer by commenting below!

Q1. His first three names were “Bellur Krishnamachar Sundararaja”. He founded his own version of an ancient Indian practice. He used to live in Pune. Who?
Q2. In various regions of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, this sweet is called Layyiya Patti, in Sindhi it’s called Lai, in Paraguay it’s called Ka’i Ladrillo. How do we better know this food item, which is very famous in Maharashtra and often used by armies to get instant energy?
Q3. The Panj Takht Special Train connects the five Takhts: or seats of authority of Sikhism. If three of them are in Punjab and one is in Bihar, in which city is the fifth?
Q4. India is among the largest producers of this fruit, with Jalgaon being the capital. Farmers used to grow the traditional Basrai, Shrimanti and Ardhapuri varities and now grow the Grand Naine and Robusta. Which fruit?